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First Motion Sim - 2DOF Seat Mover With DIY Peripherals

Discussion in 'DIY Motion Simulator Projects' started by CBC_North, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
    Starting this build log to track progress on my first motion simulator. Will feature:
    - 2DOF seat mover (Leaning towards shoulder mounted now but also looking at compact desk racer)
    - 3 bass shaker channels running simvibe
    - DIY peripherals - Sequential shifter, handbrake, pedals

    I currently have an 80% functional sim without motion. Based it off the wooden "Death Mobile" design over at ISRTV. Really like what the bass shakers added using simvibe but instantly wanted more feedback. This got me looking for motion sims and ultimately subscribed to this forum. Tons of great inspiration here and I'm going to be taking heavily from it for my design.

    Picture of my current rig below. More details of what I currently have and my plans will come later...

    Current_rig.jpg
    • Like Like x 3
  2. Zeraxx

    Zeraxx New Member Gold Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2018
    Messages:
    29
    Balance:
    195Coins
    Ratings:
    +11 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF
    Welcome, and welcome to your newest addiction, I just completed my first motion seat mover (2DOF) and the first time I used it I couldn't help a grin from ear to ear, that being said an hour later I was already starting to think of what else I could add.

    Regarding your decision about seat mover design. In addition to your storage requirement, you need to consider what type of motors you will be using also. If your going to be using smaller motors your going to want as much leverage as possible not only to produce snappy,strong movements, but also to keep temperatures down and prolong the life of your motors/psu/motor controllers.

    I used the PGsaw 50:1 80 rpm 12v 60Nm Torq. Motors from Ebay for a compact (under the seat mounted motor) and I can say the experience is amazing, but if you don't have as much torque i'd definitely consider going over the shoulder.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
    @Zeraxx Thanks for the welcome, I've actually already ordered the identical motors (50:1 from pgsaw on ebay). I figured the extra torque will give me a little more flexibility in my design. The motors should be here tomorrow.

    I've paired those with two 750W Dell NPS-750BB power supplies. Got them used off ebay for $32 CAD + shipping from ebay.

    IMG_20180710_182022.jpg

    I also bought the universal joint for the platform. There's a very good junk yard near me where you pull your own parts and pay a flat fee per part type despite what car it came from. It's where I got the seat for the rig in the first post. $40 CAD for a passenger seat from a 2007 Mitsubishi eclipse. It's actually fairly nice with suede on the bolsters and headrest but its fairly heavy. I was originally going to pull a driveshaft from the yard to salvage a u-joint ($36) but took a trip to princess auto first and am glad I did. For only $4 more I was able to get a nice beefy hardened steel universal joint and not have to crawl under a car to saw it out.

    IMG_20180710_182221.jpg IMG_20180710_182303.jpg

    A co-worker has a mig welder I can loan and I have welded in the past but I might bring this to a proper shop to get a top and bottom flange/plate welded to it. Will depend on what kind of a quote they give me. I plan on making the base/motor mounts out of heavy aluminum square stock and plate. I have a good blade for cutting aluminum on my tablesaw so I would be able to make very accurate cuts. My CNC router is also nearing completion and I'm optimistic that I will be able to mill up to 1/4" aluminum plate with it (albeit slowly). It's a "Mostly Printed CNC" (MPCNC).
    IMG_20180710_183342.jpg

    Going to start the CAD for the base tonight.
    • Like Like x 1
  4. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
    After combing through almost the entirety if the projects forum I've decided to go with a compact desk racer vs the shoulder mounted design for the following reasons:
    - Simpler and cheaper to fabricate. Won't have to fabricate the tall metal frame that extends up the back of the seat and my connector rods can be much shorter. This will limit welding as well.
    - Smaller footprint. Half of my unfinished basement (about 14' x 20') is my VR mancave. This is going in the corner of my VR play space so the larger it is, the more space I will lose from the area I use to play other games.
    - The motors I have (pgsaw 50:1) should be plenty strong for this type of rig.

    Any counter arguments to the above?

    As for a compact seat mover design, when mounting the connecting rods to the side of the seat, any advantages in mounting near the back vs the front? With a person in the seat I'm thinking the centre of gravity will likely be around the center of the chair base so neither way will give any more leverage than the other? If I mount it near the back I'm thinking I can drill a hole in the metal frame brackets of the reclining mechanism in the seat. If I mount near the front I will have to fabricate external brackets.
  5. Zeraxx

    Zeraxx New Member Gold Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2018
    Messages:
    29
    Balance:
    195Coins
    Ratings:
    +11 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF
    Great choice, that's the same reasons and design choice I did for my setup. If you wanna see it in action check out this link.


    Regarding CG position, my arms connect to MDF plywood, and then the UJoint is mounted so the center is slightly is about 2/3 back from the front of the chair.

    I also have sliders for my chair which is nice for a "fudge" factor lol, your going to love it the PGSAW 50:1 have plenty of torque, mine don't even get luke warm after hours of use. Just make sure you have some beefy speed controllers.
    • Like Like x 2
  6. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
  7. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
    Sigh, used tab to autocomplete your name and ended up posting before I was finished...

    I'll be happy if I can achieve something similar. I'm planning on using a pair of monster moto boards, one to drive each motor.

    My CAD is progressing well. Using Fusion 360 to model everything so that I'm sure it fits together before I start fabricating. This will give me more accurate numbers to plug into the sim calc program as well. I've changed my plans a bit and now will have the following:
    • Base of the platform out of wood to save on costs. Also matches the rest of the frame which is currently wood.
    • Seat base will be made of 1 inch steel tubing with an MDF or plywood platform to which the u-joint will attach. I MAY try this with just the 3/4 plywood platform as the metal seat reals I'm bolting it to may be rigid enough.
    • Motor mounts will be made of 3/16" aluminum plate cut on the CNC (hopefully).
    • Potentiometer brackets will be designed in fusion 360 and 3d printed.
    I should have some CAD to show in a few days. In the meanwhile, some new packages showed up today. New wheel for my T150 base. The adapter is being 3d printed as I'm typing this:

    Racing_wheel.jpg Wheel_adapter.jpg

    Next up after that is to redesign and reprint the faces of my DIY pedals.
  8. CBC_North

    CBC_North New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Occupation:
    Computer Engineer
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    Balance:
    85Coins
    Ratings:
    +6 / 0 / -0
    My Motion Simulator:
    2DOF, DC motor, Arduino
    Made progress on the new wheel. I have a thrustmaster T150 base which is great but I really don't like the size or the feeling of the rim. I'm also having a mechanical issue with one of my shift paddles.

    The plan is to use the following adapter to attach the new wheel to my existing base:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2762614

    Combine that with the magnetc paddle shifters from here:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1678086

    Finally, I modified the button plate from the above project and 3d printed it. Printed on paper to test the fit first:
    IMG_20180717_210202.jpg

    Sliced with a heavy infill and printed:
    button_plate_slicer.png IMG_20180717_234741.jpg

    Also printed the adapter:
    Wheel_adapter.jpg

    Fits well on the wheel with the adapter. Test fit of the buttons and knob also worked well (rest of the buttons are in the mail). The knobs will be on rotary encoders that will simulate up/down and left/right of the old dpad.
    IMG_20180718_090820.jpg IMG_20180718_135231.jpg IMG_20180718_135242.jpg

    The 3d printed button panel seems to be sturdy enough when bolted to the wheel. If I find it has any issues later on I'll consider cutting this out of a piece of aluminum plate.
    • Like Like x 2