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X Degrees = Y G's??

Discussion in 'DIY Motion Simulator Building Q&A / FAQ' started by Clayton2318, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Clayton2318

    Clayton2318 New Member

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    As I plan my rig, one question I keep coming across is the range of tilt. For example, when I have it tilt forward to simulate breaking G's .. is 10 degrees enough? Is 20 degrees enough? It all depends on how many G's I want to simulate - right?

    So I guess I'm wondering if there's some sort of equation I can use?

    My initial thought was that if I were to balance my car on it's front bumper at a 90 degree angle, this would be 1 G of breaking force - right? All of my weight would be on the seat belt holding me from falling on the dashboard / windshield. So, then is half that angle equal to half a G?

    90 Degrees = 1 G
    45 Degrees = 1/2 G
    30 Degrees = 1/3 G
  2. Ads Master

    Ads Master

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  3. noorbeast

    noorbeast VR Tassie Devil Staff Member Moderator Race Director

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    A real F1 or fighter jet can generate between 5-10 sustained Gs.

    A motion simulator can at best momentary generate perhaps a tad over 2Gs.

    What a motion simulator does is a bit of a mind trick, it gives enough of the right kind of stimuli for the brain to fill in the gaps. VR does a similar thing with vision.

    Personally I consider speed is far more important to what a motion sim can do to trick the brain than Gs, followed by how many DOF it has to create the illusion.

    Here is a bit of an overview of speed needed for good motion: http://www.xsimulator.net/community/faq/speed-needed-for-good-motion.218/

    If you want to dig a bit deeper: http://www.xsimulator.net/community/faq/calculating-basic-linear-speed-and-forces.89/
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. BlazinH

    BlazinH Well-Known Member

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    15 to 20 degrees is usually enough for most people. We don't try to accurately simulate g's because its not possible (at least without a centrifuge based simulator). A varying tilt angle is simply a representation of varying G forces.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. RacingMat

    RacingMat Well-Known Member Gold Contributor

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    here is the difference
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. SeatTime

    SeatTime Well-Known Member

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    Also depends on the type of rig you are building. With a standard 2DOF seat mover the center of rotation is under the seat (not really correct to simulate a car), which is not an issue for small angles/movements but will feel progressive more unnatural as the angle increases.
  7. Clayton2318

    Clayton2318 New Member

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    Thanks, I guess when you go around a long bend you are experiencing mostly Sway (as your body wants to go one way while the car goes the other) and a little bit of Yaw? So I was think if you did a 2DOF simulator, you'd have to fake the Sway by doing Roll - right? I was just trying to do some simple math to see if it could even create anything worthwhile.

    I was interested in doing a simple 2DOF this year ... then maybe next year (or more likely the year after) step it up to something more complex.

    Thanks again,

    Clayton
  8. noorbeast

    noorbeast VR Tassie Devil Staff Member Moderator Race Director

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    My Motion Simulator:
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    A well designed 2DOF is surprisingly good at simulating sway, roll, pitch, surge and even heave, and is a great cost effective project to start experimenting with motion simulation.
    • Agree Agree x 4