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What are the connectors called that attach to these pin terminals ??

Discussion in 'DIY Motion Simulator Building Q&A / FAQ' started by SilentChill, May 19, 2015.

  1. SilentChill

    SilentChill Problem Maker

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    [​IMG]

    Is there such a thing or do you just all solder to them ???

    I've soldered mine but i'm sure there must be a plug that you can get to clip on them.

    Ive searched but to no avail so if anyone knows please can you let me know :)
  2. Pit

    Pit - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Staff Member Moderator Gold Contributor

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    I have soldered them as well. So I am interested if someone can advise here some other solutions. (NTL the soldered wire works)
  3. cthiggin

    cthiggin Active Member

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    I had the very same question last year..............soldered mine and they work fine.
  4. noorbeast

    noorbeast VR - The Next Generation Staff Member Moderator

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    I used small slotted blade connectors, squeezed them around the poles, soldered them then used heat shrink.

    20141030_143211.jpg

    20141030_153106.jpg

    20141030_153810.jpg
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  5. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member

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    They are specifically meant to be soldered, you can tell when there isn't anything for a connector to "lock" onto the pot. Also the posts have a recess in them for the wire to be soldered to. It's not as common for pots to actually use connectors because most are used in permanent installations such as volume control, where you wouldn't want a connector to come loose or corrode on the pin terminals.

    The crimp method as above is a good way of soldering to the pins as it allows for easy re-work if needed.
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  6. Archie

    Archie Eternal tinkerer

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    As @Alexey points out, there is no connector, but the lugs are shaped in such a way to take a looped wire and hold it while you solder the wire on. This video explains it well, as I had the exact same query..

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  7. Archie

    Archie Eternal tinkerer

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    Oh... and check the specs of the Pot you are soldering. Most have a heat tolerance mark. Mine was 350C for 3 seconds before you risk damaging the internals. If you tin the wire, a quick touch is usually ample as the solder will pool on the connectors.
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  8. SilentChill

    SilentChill Problem Maker

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    Thanks all that clears that up then :)
  9. BlazinH

    BlazinH Well-Known Member

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    I believe you can use what is called a barrel connector on these if wanted and if you can find the correct size but I don’t recommend it. A properly soldered joint will give the best results electrically and you don’t have to worry about it coming loose accidentally either. And I have used a 140 watt soldering gun for much longer than three seconds on these in the past and have yet to destroy one.