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Power Entry Module Housing

Discussion in '3D Printing' started by Zed, Jul 19, 2017.

  1. Zed

    Zed VR Simming w/Reverb Gold Contributor

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    My Motion Simulator:
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    First one hot off the press. I wasn't comfortable with exposed wires connecting to the motor power supplies so threw a power module housing together to accept a modular plug, fuse, and power switch. You can't see them in the photos but there are three threaded mounting holes that will bolt the housing to the power supply and fix it in place. The power module itself isn't pushed home in the housing yet since it's pretty tight in there and once pushed in, it will be difficult to reset the spring retainers to get it back out. Still need to wire it up.

    Edit - Made a slight change to reinforce the wall at the fan clearance cutout. The zip file is the .stl file for it if anyone cares. ;) This fits the Mean Well SE-600-12 12 volt 600 Watt power supplies and mounts with M3 screws to the mounting holes on the power supply. The entry module is one of these: http://a.co/6evNcBh

    powerentry.jpg IMG_0377.JPG IMG_0378.JPG

    Attached Files:

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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
  2. Ads Master

    Ads Master

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  3. ferslash

    ferslash Active Member

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    nice one !
  4. ferslash

    ferslash Active Member

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    what do you use to design your 3d models?
    fer
  5. noorbeast

    noorbeast VR Tassie Devil Staff Member Moderator Race Director

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    My Motion Simulator:
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  6. Zed

    Zed VR Simming w/Reverb Gold Contributor

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    Thanks, @ferslash and @noorbeast!

    Ferslash - I draw this stuff up using Autodesk's Fusion 360. It's a free design program for enthusiast/home/non-profit use. Takes a bit to get used to how to do things since order can sometimes be very important, but once you get the hang of it, you can whip designs out in no time. It outputs .stl files that go right into my printer program.

    The Vive logo is an .svg file I found on the web. Fusion will import stuff like that and then you can extrude up or cut down to add raised or sunken in designs. It's very cool.
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  7. Zed

    Zed VR Simming w/Reverb Gold Contributor

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    My Motion Simulator:
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    All done. They do a great job of protecting the power connections, have built-fusing for the line side, and allow modular cords.

    IMG_3046.JPG IMG_3042.JPG IMG_3049.JPG
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