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Linear actuator using ClearPath Integrated Servo System @ 72V DC

Discussion in 'Motor actuators and drivers' started by Dirty, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. Builder

    Builder New Member

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    My Motion Simulator:
    DC motor, 6DOF
    I too am confused even after reading previous posts. I have a 3 phase connection available (Europe). Can I use this by connecting the L1, L2 and L3 and not using the Zero. In my opinion, the star / delta circuit cannot be set on the servo drive.
    Who has the redeeming answer in which I don't blow up the drive.

    Thanks,
    Builder.
  2. Dirty

    Dirty Well-Known Member Gold Contributor

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    Ahhh,... cool! I didn't even try that :) Never occurred to me. (how to remove the key)
  3. Dirty

    Dirty Well-Known Member Gold Contributor

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    I thought about using 3 phase AC as well, but I think (not sure) my servo controllers are the 240V only version
  4. Builder

    Builder New Member

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    My Motion Simulator:
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    I did some research and it is now clear to me.
    The AASD-15A needs a single phase 230V / 50Hz power supply or a three phase 220V power supply.
    The 3-phase 220V is therefore not the 3-phase 400V common in Europe.

    How about this now. The 3 phase, which is common in Europe, is structured as follows:
    [​IMG]
    There is 230V between each phase and the ZERO (Nul). But 400V is present between the phases. So if we now connect Fase1, 2 and 3 to L1, L2 and L3 from the AASD-15A, it will probably go up in smoke.

    If you still want to use 3-phase, you will have to use a 3-phase transformer in the power supply line that transforms the 3x 400V to 3x 220V.

    [​IMG]


    However, this is a very expensive solution (€ 600 and more)

    It is better to use the single-phase 230V, however, not many more users must be connected to the same group to prevent your fuse from tripping.

    You can consider connecting 3 separate sockets from a power group. You then connect 2 AASD-15A to each socket to spread the load.
    [​IMG]


    Good luck.
    :nerd
    Builder.

    Attached Files:

    • Informative Informative x 2
  5. Dirty

    Dirty Well-Known Member Gold Contributor

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    Thanks! Great explanation. That's how I understood it as well. :thumbs

    Initially my argument for wanting to use 3 phase 400V was this:
    I have 6 motors with 1050W of power. So theoretically the motors could draw 6300W from the mains. Since european mains is 240V, it would have to draw 26A. That would have tripped the 16A breaker.

    Then I considered doing just what you suggested. Connect two motors to each 240V phase. That meant I could theoretically supply 11520W.:grin

    But eventually I wired all six motors up to a single 240V line, "just to do some testing" and also the computer, 3D printer, lights and monitor all draw from that same line and it still didn't trip the breaker. Ever.

    I think that goes hand in hand with what I said earlier, over 99% of the time those motors operate at somwhere around 10-20% load.

    Cheers,... Dirty :)