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Difference between yaw and traction loss

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Oms, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. Oms

    Oms known as "Doc6dof"

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    Hello everybody,
    could one you explain me what is the difference between yaw and traction loss (or give me a post where I can have information). Indeed for me that seems to be exactly the same: a rotation around Z axes !
    (I am currently building a simulator, and I would like to have traction loss)
    thank you
  2. Bord-Ing.

    Bord-Ing. New Member

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    Yes, both are in deed rotations around a z axis. The difference is the position of this axis in x direction. At a slow trip through a curve (or heavy understeer) this position would be in the near of the back axle. Considering a race car (which should have no understeer), this position is somewhere in the back middle of the car. At this point your car slides over all 4 wheels through the curve and the steering angle is somewhat reduced compared to normal curve speed (tried this once with my 245 hp Subaru :D ).

    Suddenly, because of some debris on the track, the rear tires have no grip at all => the rear of the car turns out of the trace and you do a cool drift. Z axis is in this case near the front axle.

    So, to shorten this:
    • normal curve: Z axis is more behind the driver
    • traction loss (heavy oversteer): Z axis is in front of the driver, near his feet.
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  3. Oms

    Oms known as "Doc6dof"

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    ok thanks, cristal clear explanation. On my current simulator building, the z axis is at the vertical of the knees, so not so bad to feel traction loss, I think I will let like that...
    If not enough I will buy a Subaru...
  4. yobuddy

    yobuddy Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator SimTools Developer SimAxe Beta Tester Gold Contributor SimTools 2.0 Beta Tester

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    From the games standpoint, Yaw is the 'compass' heading you are traveling.
    Where Traction Loss if the difference in the 'compass' heading vs the way the vehicle is currently pointing.

    Under normal conditions the 'compass' heading should be the same direction that the vehicle is pointing.
    If it's not, the rear has slid out and a traction loss has occurred.

    Take care,
    yobuddy
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  5. Oms

    Oms known as "Doc6dof"

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    thank you for this complement of information.
    In anycase, I suppose inner ear & body are only sensitive to accelerations & forces...