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Cousin of OSW (Open Sim Wheel)

Discussion in 'DIY Motion Simulator Projects' started by Gadget999, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    Ok, looking closer - The green thing is not an encoder, it's just a 360 degree Hall sensor. That will not work.
    You need a rotary encoder

    So unfortunately, the only parts you have there you can use is the wheel and the motor.

    If you buy the EMC firmware, it comes with full wiring diagrams but it is STM32 only, not arduino. No affiliation, I have just tried all of them and the EMC firmware is lightyears ahead of anything else out there.

    Shopping list:
    Encoder
    IBT-2
    STM32 (F401C) and probably a programmer
    Power Supply (I recommend HP Server power supplies - Cheap, quiet and easy to mod)
    EMC Firmware (By donation, I think the minimum is 10 Euro)
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. 2nasty4u

    2nasty4u ROOKIE BUT LEARNING FAST Gold Contributor

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    Ok thank you so you never mentioned what creates the torque though
  3. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    Specifically - The IBT-2 is a H Bridge which is just a module to drive a DC motor forwards and backwards (and in this case) with a PWM and direction signal. The power supply is connected to the IBT-2 and so is the motor. The controller then sends a PWM/FFB signal to the IBT-2 to *try* to turn the motor but you have your hands on it so it does not turn, but will be felt as torque.
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2022
  4. 2nasty4u

    2nasty4u ROOKIE BUT LEARNING FAST Gold Contributor

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    What I'm asking is there's no gearing or anything the motor provides all the torque it's just motor to the wheel nothing in between?
  5. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    Thats right. How much torque you get will depend on the motor and the current you can supply it.
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. 2nasty4u

    2nasty4u ROOKIE BUT LEARNING FAST Gold Contributor

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    Okay I got it now I understand now thank you
  7. 2nasty4u

    2nasty4u ROOKIE BUT LEARNING FAST Gold Contributor

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    Could you please post a pic of the stm32 and the programmer as I have never seen one before that would help me out a lot thank you
  8. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    Of course - That means up until the motor melts:
    If it's a 350w motor running at 24v, Max load is theoretically about 15A
    Run it at 12v and that goes to ~30A but it can't sustain that for very long at all before it fuses the windings and/or melts the enamel causing a short.

    Basically, you want to keep the power somewhere around what the motor would normally give off as heat at max load. That would be around 20-30% so about 10A (Sustained) - You might get away with one IBT-2 at that.

    BUT - You can only limit that with the max power setting in the EMC software, there is not really a way to limit it electrically.

    The occasional peak at 30A is still fine (say for example pushing past 'wheel lock') but you don't want to keep it there. This is configurable in software too.

    Remember - We're operating in stall mode so almost ALL of the energy consumed is going to be given off as heat and not rotational movement like the motor is designed for.

    I linked the programmer in my post - You are looking for an ST-Link v2. They are only a couple of dollars. You can use a serial programmer but the software to program it with is an absolute pain (will take multiple tries to get it to work and it's slow).
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. Karli774

    Karli774 New Member

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  10. Gadget999

    Gadget999 Well-Known Member

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    If you add a gearbox it will no longer be a DD wheel
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  11. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    It's totally up to you but it all depends on how much resistance the gears are going to create. If there is too much then it will feel mushy and awkward. Gearing might be ok but I think you would regret using that motor if you felt a DD.

    Where will you connect encoder? You might be able to use a lower pulse encoder on the back of the motor still I guess but a 1000ppr encoder works on both A/B and rising/falling edge so upscales to 4000ppr. 24000 ppr at 6:1... That's a lot.
  12. Crimson_wshd

    Crimson_wshd New Member

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    Hi! First of all, thank you very much for sharing these information with us. I learned a lot reading through all these comments.
    I am planning to build my first sim wheel set, but I just cannot figure out how to attach the steering wheel to the motor shaft. Can someone please point me at the right direction please? Thank you very much.
  13. elnino

    elnino Active Member

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    There is plenty of info here. I also have a build log for mine and I have shared files for 3d printing an adapter.
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3208235

    The important part is to NOT rely on the little gear on the shaft to hold the wheel - It is generally loose and it will 'clunk' from side to side against the FFB. That's why I introduced two grub screws into the side of the shaft that go where you would normally put a spanner for removing the shaft nut.

    My design does not need the shaft nut done up too tight as it's not the primary means of securing it like you might expect.
    • Useful Useful x 1
    Last edited: May 19, 2022